August 2012

The rights, privileges, and responsibilities afforded to married individuals in the United States are vast and varied.  As a matter of clear public policy, federal, state, and local governments grant married individuals everything from tax breaks to survivorship rights.  Gay and lesbian couples across the country have sought to be included in these benefits and obligations.  They have seen success in recent years in various state courts and legislatures, including being granted inclusion in marriage in a few, civil unions in some, and domestic partnerships in others.  Despite such gains for these couples, 31 states have recently amended their constitutions to specifically deny such recognition.  In these states, gay and lesbians are left with no other option than to attempt to contract around their inability to obtain governmental recognition of their unions; Minnesota is currently considering whether to pass a similar amendment.

http://www.freedomtomarry.org/states/

Project 515, based here in Minnesota, has discovered that “most of the rights provided to married couples cannot be replicated by signing legal documents or contracts.” [click to continue…]

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As published in the Harvard Law & Policy Review, Kevin M. Clermont & Stewart J. Schwab observed that from 1979-2006, plaintiffs bringing employment law matters (discrimination, wrongful termination, etc) in federal court won only 15% of the time. When paired with the observation that plaintiffs in non job-related matters won 51% of the time, that 15% figure is stunning. Questions as to why there is such an imbalance in employment law compared to other areas of law have been the focus of many journalists, lawyers and academics. But for attorneys who represent plaintiffs in employment discrimination cases, there is one key factor worth focusing on: properly preparing a case to survive motions for dismissal, particularly summary judgement motions.

http://www.hlpronline.com/Vol3.1/Clermont-Schwab_HLPR.pdf

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Minnesota Employment Lawyers

Madia Law represented “Laura” – a physician’s assistant who was hired by a medical clinic that found Laura through a recruiting agency.  After hiring Laura, the clinic began making deductions from her checks to cover the “recruitment fee” that it paid the agency to find Laura.  In total, the clinic deducted close to $30,000 from Laura’s wages to recover its recruitment costs.

Read More . . .

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The City of Minneapolis has paid out more than $15 million in the last six years for lawsuits alleging police misconduct. In a one-two punch that will mean the end of the Minneapolis Police Civilian Review Authority (CRA), the Minneapolis City Council and the Minnesota State Legislature are currently taking steps that will likely see that amount increase as victims of police misconduct are left with little choice but to file similar lawsuits if they are to expect any meaningful independent oversight.

http://www.minneapolismn.gov/www/groups/public/@civilrights/documents/webcontent/wcms1p-084648.pdf

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